Wednesday, September 21, 2016


Utah senator Mike Lee wrote on Daily Signal why it's bad to risk letting totalitarian regimes get hold of the internet:
Just five years after ICANN was created, the United Nations established a Working Group on Internet Governance “to investigate and make proposals for action … on the governance of Internet.” And in 2012 at the World Conference on International Telecommunications, several authoritarian regimes—including Russia, China, and Saudi Arabia—called for the “sovereign right” of governments to “establish and implement public policy, including international policy, on matters of Internet governance.”
There's every chance they still have that goal in mind, so letting them get hold of the web would only be bad news, and that's why a transfer should be opposed. Also, as noted here:
ICANN is currently involved in litigation over alleged improper interference from governments who objected to how the organization awarded the .africa domain name. And the organization was recently admonished by an independent review panel for making decisions that were “cavalier” and “simply not credible” in relation to an application for domain names.
As discovered earlier, ICANN's also got shady people involved, one more reason why they're not fit yet to be a steward on their own. In fact, with that record, there's valid grounds not to let them manage the web, but rather, to assign another business, non-profit or otherwise, to handle things.

One of the commenters also said:
I would suggest that IF our LIAR-in-CHIEF gets HIS WAY and gives up the TOTAL CONTROL of the internet to the U.N., then the people of America should start our OWN and separate internet inside America and leave the rest of the world out of OUR internet until we get a FREE & OPEN internet back from the U.N. so we can have what we have NOW, if you could call what we have now, an entirely free & open without our goverment controlling even partially what we see & hear over our portion of the internet.
This reflects what I was thinking pretty well. There could be a separate internet corporation established, providing needed competition for domain development and such. There's no need to let one company have a monopoly on internet development. Whatever the outcome of the fight to protect the web as it stands now, I think the competition should be started now, because it could have benefits in the future.

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