Thursday, October 15, 2015


The Hadassah Ein Kerem hospital prides itself on co-existence between Jews and Arabs. And according to this article, an Arabic doctor saved the life of a Jewish 13-year-old, which is very commendable and heroic. However, they've also done something very stupid:
As a wave of violence sweeps across Jerusalem, victims and perpetrators are often surprised to be reunited — at each other's bedside in the city's largest emergency ward.

The Hadassah Medical Center prides itself on checking politics at the door and treating Palestinian attackers and Jewish victims alike. But the tensions on the street are increasingly seeping through the hospital's sterile walls, with family members clashing in the hallways and causing the wounded even more trauma. [...]

The hospital corridors are filled with women wearing traditional Muslim dresses and headscarves walking alongside ultra-Orthodox Jews and patients with Jewish skullcaps. But the notion of Arabs and Jews being as inseparable in the hospital as they are outside doesn't sit well with everyone.

Odel Bennett has been hospitalized at Hadassah since a Palestinian stabbed her husband Aharon to death on Oct. 3, seriously wounded her and lightly wounded their 2-year-old son Natan. The attacker stabbed another Israeli man to death before being shot dead.

The 22-year-old Bennett recalled how her pleas for help were mocked by local Arab merchants, who laughed at her and told her to "die" while a knife was still stuck in her body.

When Bennett learned that a Palestinian woman who stabbed an Israeli man in the Old City several days later was being treated just four doors down the hall, she began to shake and have an anxiety attack.

"It is very, very hard to have a victim next to someone who tried to murder,"
she said from her hospital bed, where she is still recovering from 11 stab wounds. "I understand that the hospital has to take them. I just don't know why they aren't treated in prisons. That's the reality."

Her mother, Miriam Gal, was less diplomatic. Outraged that the woman's family was wandering the halls freely and that one of her relatives got into a fight with a police officer stationed there, she demanded the 18-year-old Palestinian, suffering from gunshot wounds, be moved to a different ward. The hospital ultimately agreed and moved her to a separate ward. When she was ready for discharge this week, the hospital turned her over to police.

"We are a terror-stricken family who is hurting, suffering and bereaved," Gal said, shaking. "It is disgusting and outrageous. She has no right to even live and then you put her here?" [...]

As the Jerusalem region's major trauma center, Hadassah is usually the first stop for both sides after violent attacks. Victims and wounded attackers, often suffering gunshot wounds after being shot by police or armed bystanders, continued to file in Monday amid another spurt of violence.

Dvora Kirshenbaum, an emergency room nurse, said they sometimes end up literally lying next to each other.

"We detach and treat the person we need to treat professionally without getting into emotional considerations. Everyone has their beliefs and opinions outside the hospital," she said. "That is the profession we chose."
I'm afraid their ideology that does accompany them into the medical ward is very embarrassing and offensive to innocent victims of jihad. If it doesn't happen at foreign hospitals, then it shouldn't happen at Israeli hospitals either. They should've been able to figure out this could actually make it worse for the innocent pedestrians, and if they really want to prove they're not that morally equivalent, they'll make every effort to put victim and perpetrator in separate wards from now on.

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